Care & Feeding Guide

Caring for the instrument is certainly an inherently tricky matter for most instrument owners. Here are some simple explanations for day to day problems faced by most instrument owners. For a more detailed guide on caring for your instrument, download a copy of our care and feeding guide. .

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  1. Prepare strings and tools such as winder (optional), cutter, and tuner.

  2. Using the winder, loosen all the strings.

  3. After loosening all the strings, remove the bridge pins using the cutter. Make sure to apply just enough force to hold the head of the pin to avoid damaging it.

  4. Remove all the strings from the bridge hole.

  5. You can coil all the strings together. You can use pliers to uncoil the strings from the machine heads. Be careful for the end of the strings might pierce your hand.

  6. Place the ball end of the strings on the bridge hole and secure it by putting the bridge pins on top.

  7. Insert the strings on the hole of the machine head. Pull the strings all the way to the end.

  8. Place your finger at the nut. Pull the strings back until you reach the first fret. This is the allowance you will need for the strings.

  9. While holding down the strings, turn the machine heads at the direction where the entry point of the strings on the hole is on the inside part of the headstock.

  10. To secure the strings, the excess part of the strings should go under the strings (nearer the nut area) at the first coil.

  11. After one coil, the excess strings should go above the strings (nearer the nut area).

  12. When the string is tight enough to hold itself in place, cut the excess strings using the cutter.

  13. Repeat steps until all the strings are in place.

  14. Using the tuner, tune the strings one by one. As the strings are new, you might need to retune every string until all are in standard tuning. For more information on how to care for your instrument, download our care and feeding guide for more information. Click here.

  1. Prepare strings and tools such as winder (optional), cutter, and tuner.

  2. Using the winder, loosen all the strings.

  3. After loosening all the strings, remove the knots on the bridge followed by all the strings from the bridge hole.

  4. You can coil all the strings together.

  5. You can use pliers to uncoil the strings from the machine heads. Be careful for the end of the strings as it might pierce your hand.

  6. Pull the string through the bridge almost all the way, leaving two to three inches sticking out.

  7. Loop the free end under the string just behind the saddle and pull it back to toward the end of guitar.

  8. Pass the free end under the loop, below the back corner of the bridge and pull the string tight. (Nylon-loop twice, Steel-looping once is enough)

  9. Insert the string into the hole of the machine head. Pull the strings all the way to the end.

  10. Place your finger at the nut. Pull the strings back until you reach the first fret. This is the allowance you will need for the strings.

  11. Tie a knot on the machine head.

  12. While holding down the strings, turn the machine heads at the direction where the entry point of the strings on the hole is on the inside part of the headstock.

  13. When the string is tight enough to hold itself in place, cut the excess strings using the cutter.

  14. Repeat steps until all the strings are in place.

  15. Making sure that the strings on the bottom row are being coiled outwards. While the rest are coiled inwards.

  16. Using the tuner, tune the strings one by one. As the strings are new, you might need to retune every string until all are in standard tuning.

  1. Prepare strings and tools such as winder (optional), cutter, and tuner.

  2. Using the winder, loosen all the strings.

  3. After loosening all the strings, remove the knots on the bridge followed by all the strings from the bridge hole.

  4. You can coil all the strings together. You can use pliers to uncoil the strings from the machine heads. Be careful for the end of the strings as it might pierce your hand.

  5. Pull the string through the bridge almost all the way, leaving two to three inches sticking out.

  6. Loop the free end under the string just behind the saddle and pull it back to toward the end of guitar.

  7. Pass the free end under the loop twice, below the back corner of the bridge and pull the string tight.

  8. Insert the string into the hole of the machine head. Pull the strings all the way to the end.

  9. Place your finger at the nut. Pull the strings back until you reach the first fret. This is the allowance you will need for the strings.

  10. Tie a knot on the machine head.

  11. While holding down the strings, turn the machine heads at the direction where the entry point of the strings on the hole is on the inside part of the headstock.

  12. To secure the strings, the excess part of the strings should go under the strings (nearer the nut area) at the first coil. After one coil, the excess strings should go above the strings (nearer the nut area).

  13. When the string is tight enough to hold itself in place, cut the excess strings using the cutter.

  14. Repeat steps until all the strings are in place.

  15. Using the tuner, tune the strings one by one. As the strings are new, you might need to retune every string until all are in standard tuning.

  1. Keep your instrument inside the case or bag while transporting. We recommend that you use a hardcase to transport your instrument. For convenience during shorter travels, you can consider using a properly padded gig-bag.
  2. When you are using a padded bag, be watchful of your surroundings, especially while walking/riding the bike to avoid knocking your instrument. If you are slinging your instrument on your back, be cautious of low ceilings to avoid knocking the protruding headstock.
  3. Avoid placing any loose objects inside the case that might scratch or dent the instrument. For hardcases, place those items in the compartment. If you are using a bag, do place the accessories in the outside pocket but do not place any sharp objects that might scratch or dent the guitar.
  4. We recommend always resting your instrument horizontally, even if it is inside a hardcase. Resting it vertically, especially on places that have a possibility of the instrument sliding down, will increase the force of impact on instrument when it falls down.
  5. If you’re travelling by car, don’t place your guitar in the trunk. It’s much safer in the back seat because most car trunks are neither heated nor ventilated, so the temperatures can fluctuate wildly. Freezing or overheating your guitar is an invitation for a crack or warp to occur. Your guitar is assembled with glues that can be affected by heat, which causes the breakdown and loosening of glue adhesion. Most commonly affected is the bridge.
  6. Flying with your guitar

    Air travel has become the most popular mode of commercial transportation, but protection of your instrument is critical. Airlines don’t set out to damage guitars intentionally, but a conveyor system can’t tell a guitar from other baggage. Airlines may consider a guitar to be too fragile for their handling and may require that a waiver be signed which limits or removes their liability. Don’t sign such a document if you can avoid it.

    Even a hard case can’t always protect a guitar from damage from mishandling by individuals or commercial carriers. Occasionally you can bypass the usual baggage handling system by asking to take your guitar to the boarding area where it can be tagged and hand carried to the airplane. Upon arrival, notify the flight attendant or customer service representative and try to retrieve it at the gate. Not all airlines give you this option. There are size restrictions on carry-on luggage. It must fit in the overhead bin or under the seat ahead of you.

    Some flight attendants may allow you to try the overhead bin, but if it doesn’t fit; it may have to be checked as baggage. We recommend that you detune the instrument by 1-2 steps to reduce the tension on the neck prior to checking-in the instrument but avoid a complete release of tensional pull on the neck as there is a chance your neck angle may be affected. Using a soft cotton/foam packing material to keep the guitar tight in its case will decrease the possibility of damage while a guitar is in the baggage compartment. Using a Maestro hard case will help, but a good case is not a cure-all for careless handling or accidents.

Your Maestro instrument was built in a humidity-controlled workshop with a Relative Humidity of 45% to 55% to ensure that it is able to adapt to humidity and climatic changes when proper measures are taken. It is ideal to store your instrument within the same range of Relative Humidity to prevent the unwanted effects of humidity to your instrument.

Wood is hygroscopic in nature. It absorbs and releases moisture depending on the humidity conditions in the environment. Though your instrument is made in a humidity-controlled environment, the wood will continue to release and absorb moisture regardless of age, material, and build quality, causing the wood to shrink or expand.

Effects of exposure to extreme humidity accounts for most of instrument repairs. Aside from being costly, the effects of such damages might be irreversible.

Relative Humidity (RH)

Relative Humidity is the prevailing degree of moisture held in the atmosphere relative to the temperature. The higher the temperature, the more moisture there is in the atmosphere. The lower the temperature, the less moisture there is in the atmosphere.

The wood being hygroscopic, it will absorb moisture when the RH is high for there is a lot of moisture in the atmosphere. On the other hand, the wood will release moisture when the RH is low for there is less moisture in the atmosphere. These humidity changes may cause the wood in your guitar to expand and contract as it releases and absorbs moisture.

The initial step in protecting your instrument from humidity-related damages is by using hygrometers, a tool detecting the humidity level.

High Humidity

When the RH is high (>55%), the wood in your instrument will absorb moisture causing the wood to expand. Though the effects of high humidity are not immediately noticeable, long exposure of the instrument to such condition may cause warping and deformation of the wood.

Low Humidity

When the RH is low (<45%), the wood in your instrument will release moisture causing the wood to shrink. Exposure to such condition will cause the wood to become brittle and eventually crack.

*For a more detailed explanation on how to better manage humidity related issues, refer to our care and feeding guide